The Antonym to Stereotypes and Archetypes

We all know we shouldn’t use stereotypes for the hero or heroine in our novels.

Stereotypes are conventional and predictable and often boring, and it is therefore difficult to keep the reader’s interest with a stereotypical character. We use them for minor characters—the nerd for example. Stereotypes go hand in hand with tropes, which can best be described as the expected (or predictable) behavior of the stereotypical character. The nerd will probably wear glasses, have a dorky haircut, and be a wizard on computers. We all know that, and the readers expect it.

We tend to use archetypes for our primary characters, as defined by psychologist Carl Gustav Jung. Typical archetypes are the hero, the villain, the rebel, the healer, the mentor, etc.

We know they will portray and follow universal patterns of human behavior, which enables us to make them more realistic, because we understand what their motivations would…

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The Art of Writing a Review …

So, you’ve read a great book lately have you? Maybe even found yourself a new “keeper” author. Can’t wait for that next great read?

Like any other entertainment professional, authors need encouragement. Validation over and above the initial sale. Where do we get that much-needed encouragement? Through an honest review.

'The end. Well, time for bed. What are you writing?'
Tips for leaving a review
:

  • Most importantly, a review can be short. Don’t feel like you have to recap the entire book. That’s the sole purpose of the posted blurb. Two to three sentences outlining your reaction is more than enough. And, of course, set the ‘star’ ranking.
    • Example: “I usually don’t care for secret baby stories, but this one was different. Cody was the smartest, cutest thing ever. Sometimes adults are so stupidly blind, but that’s what makes love grand! Great story.”~ 5-star Amazon Review for Home is Where the Hunk is
  • If you do choose…

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Writing the Blurb for your Book

This is my latest post on the Soul Mate Publishing blog.

I don’t know about you, but I find writing the Facebook hook and the blurb one of the most difficult tasks of all. It’s far more difficult than writing the story. I believe this is probably because it is so important. It’s either going to make people want to buy your book or pass it over.

My first word of advice is start early—as soon as your manuscript is accepted—and don’t be afraid to tweak it often, or change it totally, but do have it ready by the time your publisher asks for it.

Over time, I’ve done a lot of research. I even bought and read several books on copywriting. The following is what I’ve come up with:

Facebook Hook: (Why won’t readers be able to put your book down?)

WHO is the protagonist of your story. WHAT goal are the striving for? WHAT obstacle is in their path?…

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You Can Write a Best-Seller

Never give up hope!

Almost every writer has a dream about breaking out—or achieving best-seller status. Many of us think it’s an impossibility, but recently I read something to change all of that.

I joined Romance Writers of America (RWA), and one of the two significant positives I’ve gained from belonging to the organization is their monthly magazine. In the March issue, five authors who have recently broken out are interviewed. The crazy thing—no one author could offer a single specific strategy that caused her book to break out.

Brenda Novak says she didn’t do anything particularly different with Trust Me, her seventh single title.

Robyn Carr broke out with her 25th novel, Virgin River Christmas, 30 years after selling her first book. She had embarked on an aggressive marketing promotion when she started her Virgin River series, but she didn’t do anything to focus on that particular book, the 4

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